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Kindred Eats: Buttermilk Pound Cake

Buttermilk Pound Cake

Baking is so much fun! 

It's easier than cooking because you can mix, pour, throw in the oven, and walk away for hours. 

When you come back, your cake is done. It's awesome!

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After mixing all of the liquid ingredients first, you make sure that all of the bumps are out. Then, you mix all of the dry mixtures together with the liquid portions. 

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Grease your pan all the way around and ensure that flour coats the inside of your bundt pan.  

 

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Then, you get a mixer (hopefully) and ensure to have all of the bumps worked out. Bake it for 10-12 minutes, or until golden brown. 

 

 

 

 

#KindredApprovedEats

 

Recipe: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/7722/buttermilk-pound-cake-ii/

When you get done, the cake should come out looking like this.   You can make the icing any way you'd like but I like the lemon juice and sugar approach. Mix lots of powdered sugar with lemon juice and keep mixing it up until you're ready to use. DO NOT refrigerate the icing.   Your final cake will end up looking like this and tasting like a piece of Heaven.   You're welcome.     

When you get done, the cake should come out looking like this. 

You can make the icing any way you'd like but I like the lemon juice and sugar approach. Mix lots of powdered sugar with lemon juice and keep mixing it up until you're ready to use. DO NOT refrigerate the icing. 

Your final cake will end up looking like this and tasting like a piece of Heaven. 

You're welcome.  

 

Black History, Through a Panther

I was not raised on comics. To my husband's dismay, I can't tell you the difference between Marvel characters and those from the DC universe. But, I know movies. Good ones, bad ones, great ones, and those which should have died on concept.

February, in particular, brings a sense of remembrance and reflection. This year, there's a new level of excitement with Black Panther premiering tonight! 

We are often shown images and movies of our enslavement - including our brutal torture, rape, and dismemberment - but, rarely are we shown images of our roots in royalty. Black Panther breaks that mold with a majority Black cast (fine and beautiful) who are not shown in bondage, but rather thriving in unity and royal freedom. 

We needed this movie, not just for us but for the country. Hell, the world. Especially now. We need something that not only unites us, but inspires us to be better. Together. As a community. 

That uniting cinema that can transcend into our reality and serve as a catalyst for change.

This is it. 

Don't sleep on it.

#KindredApproved  

Dope Queens, Two of Them

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If you haven't already met them, allow me to introduce Phoebe and Jessica. 

Though we haven't met, yet, they're two of my closest friends.

Their podcast made the workday fly by. 

Their witty banter and playful tones made for insightful conversations and stomach-grabbing laughs. For about an hour, I listened to what felt like my best friends talk about politics, men, masturbating, and weaves, among other things. 

So, when I passed a billboard announcing their four-part HBO series, I was ecstatic! There is a difference between hearing someone laugh and watching their smile appear on their face. It's magical! 

(Sidenote: their guest comics are hilarious!)  

Listening to them melted my heart. Made me appreciate their #BlackGirlMagic and how painstakingly great women are. Watching them Sunday nights on HBO, the new mecca for Black women creators...well, it made me fall in love with them all over again. 

#KindredApproved Must See TV

My 23AndMe Experience

Every year, my immediate family participates in our own version of Secret Santa. We each get a piece of paper with three empty lines for us to write our top three wants for gifts. We draw names around Thanksgiving and have a $50 limit.

It’s a nice way to ensure that we don’t go crazy trying buy gifts for everyone and it also ensures that we actually receive something we want. 

23AndMe

I wrote down (and crossed out) a few trivial items - boots, makeup, clothes - and eventually rewrote two of them. But, for the other, I wrote down the 23andMe.com DNA kit.

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For years, I’ve wanted to know my heritage. As a family, we can trace our ancestry back to the farm my great-grandfather grew up on in Shreveport, Louisiana but that’s as far back as our records go. I wanted to know which country we stemmed from and if the rumors about our great-grandmother being part Native American were true. (Spoiler alert: they were!) 

When we finally held our gift exchange, I was really excited to open my gift. They were a pair of boots, which was equally as exciting though not my top choice. I would later find out that my husband had already purchased the kit for me! The instructions are extremely simple and printed clearly and distinctly on the package. (Kudos to the developers!) After I took note of the special ID listed on my tube, I placed it in the postage paid package and mailed it off.

Almost a week later, I received an email saying that the scientists at 23andMe received my specimen and were working on my ancestry and health kit. I was joyous because I felt like I was one step closer to a hidden piece of my family. Growing up, I’d been the topic of conversation mainly because of my mocha complexion and distinctly long and wavy hair. Others would say, “No, you’re not Black. Your hair’s too straight.” Or, “Has anyone ever told you you look mixed?” 

At the time, I took their comments as compliments because I’d already conditioned myself to believe that there was something negative about being Black. (I don’t think that anymore, thank God.) 

Well, after a months time, the results came in and I officially know my heritage! I’m 84% West African, 14% Scandinavian, 1%  Native American and 1% unidentified.  (The unidentified portion is a bit puzzling to me, too.) 

I’m elated to know that I’m West African because I didn’t know for so long! But, I can’t help but question from which country does my family line stem?  Am I Ghanaian or Senegalese? Or from one of the other several countries? 

A friend suggested I do ancestry.com’s test to get a more detailed summary. I might just take her up on the idea! 

Until then, the search continues! 

ManUp: Web Series

Man Up: a colloquial term that instructs someone (usually a Black male) to take responsibility, and/or eliminate stereotypical "soft" emotions; to be strong. 

MAN UP


I grew up watching my grandfather and uncle converse about sports, family, racism, and finances. Today, sometimes when I close my eyes, I can still see them sitting in our living room on warm Saturday mornings holding court about everything! 

As I contemplated it, I realized that there are some young men and women who've never experienced this. They've never seen two Black men have an intimate conversation, aside from those on popular TV shows. So, my thought was to bring these natural conversations to a broader audience. Not to expose them, but to show their humanity and increase outside knowledge of the depth that surrounds Black men. 

In the coming months, ManUp will debut, showing these Black men interviewing each other about family, females, and manhood. Their stories are unique and similar, heartbreaking and warming, new and familiar. I will also include separate posts about each interview to give background information about each man and what I felt were key takeaways. 

Subscribe to our YouTube channel so you don't miss any episodes of the series. 

#KindredApproved